Posted by Elizabeth Curtin on

It's that time of year again. inovia is once again sending five attendees to San Diego, CA for the 137th INTA Annual Meeting from May 2nd - May 6th. This year, over 9,500 professionals from 150 countries have registered for the premier international trademark and IP event. 

If you our your team will be attending, visit Booth #1835 where we will be exhibiting with RWS Group. Please stop by to meet our teams and pick up a copy of our popular PCT national stage entry guide.

If you are interested in scheduling a meeting outside of the exhibition hall, please contact the below individuals:

We hope to see you soon in California. For continuous coverage from the meeting, don't forget to follow us on Twitter @inoviaIP.

Posted by Elizabeth Curtin on

The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) recently released their annual report, IP Facts and Figures. The study provides an overview of IP activity using the latest available year of statistics. This years publication covers four types of industrial property - patents, utility models, trademarks and industrial design.

Filing activity for patents and trademarks increased last year, representing the fourth year of growth for these two IP rights. An estimated 2.6 million applications were filed (up 9% from the previous year). Utility model applications grew by an even greater margin, primarily because of a significant increase of filings in China - to 18%. Trademark filings rose by about 6% and industrial design filing activity grew by a marginal 2.5%, significantly less than the 16% recorded increase over the previous year. Download the entire report here for all facts and figures.

For more IP updates, please follow us on Twitter @inoviaIP and LinkedIn

Posted by Elizabeth Curtin on

Happy Friday! The first week of spring is in the books and we can't wait for warmer weather and longer days here in NYC. Read on for the latest foreign patent filing headlines from the past week:

  • Panasonic Corp decided to release 50 of their patents in the marketplace to make IP information more freely accessible. This includes releasing vital information to rival corporations. (You read that correctly!) Read more here.
  • U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker announced the appointment of Russell Slifer as Deputy Director of the USPTO.
  • The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is increasing the page limits for some filings in America Invents Act reviews, effective immediately.
  • inovia news: Once again, we will be sponsoring the IP SpringPosium on April 10th and 11th. Director of Business Development, Chris Karel will be attending on behalf of inovia. Get in contact if you would like to schedule a meeting.

 Thanks for reading this week. Be sure to follow us on Twitter @inoviaIP for related information and updates. 

Posted by Elizabeth Curtin on

Hello, readers! Our friends at AFD China recently released their monthly newsletter. Please see below for the highlights from March: 

  • A draft of China's first e-commerce law will be completed by the end of this year setting up further deliberation by the top legislature in 2016.
  • With a new bill, lawmakers in China are asking for greater monetary incentives for inventors in academia to commercially benefit from their work.
  • As patent infringement and violations have increased in the past few years, Chinese experts are urging legislation for trade secret protection.
  • The China Innovation Index (CII), which measures innovation capability, rose 3.1% to 152.8 in 2013.
  • China has become one of the most popular applicants for patents in Europe over the past few years. Filings from China reached 26,472, accounting for around 9% of the total received.

Thanks again to our colleagues at AFD China for issuing this very informative newsletter. Also, for more updates relating to foreign patent filing, please follow us on Twitter @inoviaIP.

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Good afternoon! Each month, we look through WIPO's PCT Newsletter to share the latest news impacting the international patent system. As always, there are several country-specific rules, fee changes and patent office notifications to report. Please see below for a recap of the major headlines from March:

PCT Filings in 2014

 The use of the Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) grew in 2014, with around 215,000 applications filed, an increase of 4.5% from 2013. The top 10 filing destinations was the same as in 2013, with the USA (28.6% of all filings), Japan (19.7%) and China (11.9%) holding strong as the top 3 countries respectfully. Among the top 10 countries, China saw the largest growth, with a double digit increase of 18.7%. The UK recorded the second fastest growth (+9%), followed by the United States (+7.1%).

2015 PCT User Survey

WIPO is conducting a user survey of the community in an effort to assess customer satisfaction in respect to the PCT. If interested in participating in the survey, send an email with the subject line "Participation in the 2015 PCT Survey" to pct.our@wipo.int.

PCT Information Updates

Brazil (fees) - The transmittal fee for international applications filed on paper has changed to BRL 260. 

New Zealand (email address; fees) - The email address of the Intellectual Property Office has changed to epct@iponz.govt.nz. Also, there is no longer a fee for the priority document.

Please check back next month for more PCT updates. In the meantime, please follow us on Twitter @inoviaIP

Posted by Elizabeth Curtin on

 The EPO's Annual Report 2014 was released which we previously wrote about in January. Here are the final statistics:

Highlights from 2014 included improving access to Asian patent information while consolidating patent data from around the world. Preparation for the unitary patent was also in full swing with significant progress made in the area. Many countries ratified the unitary patent agreement and progress was made in ironing out the practicality of the system.

PCT filings increased over the past five years and in 2014 the total number of filings at the EPO included around 60,000 direct European filings and 214,000 international filings under the PCT (274,174 total, up 3.1% from the previous year).

Roughly 1/3 of the total filings in 2014 came from the EPO member states and 2/3 came from outside of Europe. Once again, the top 5 countries were the United States, Japan, Germany, China and South Korea. China showed the largest increase (+18%), followed by the United States (+7%) and South Korea (+2%).

The top list of applicants were as follows: 1) Samsung - 2,541 applications, 2) Philips - 2,317 applications, 3) Siemens - 2,133 applications, 4) LG - 1,638 applications and 5) Huawei - 1,600 applications. Among the top ten filers, five came from Europe, three from Asia and 2 from the United States. The sectors were primarily from electronics and IT.

Posted by Elizabeth Curtin on

Guest post by John Nemazi, Co-chair of Brooks Kushman's patent prosecution group:

On February, 13, 2015, the U.S. took a major step towards implementing the Hague Agreement Concerning the International Registration of Industrial Designs by depositing an instrument of ratification with World Intellectual Property Organization (“WIPO”). As a result, the treaty – which the U.S. initially signed in 1999 – will go into effect for U.S. applicants on May 13, 2015. 

The Hague Agreement establishes a streamlined, international system for filing applications to protect industrial designs, such as product configurations and surface ornamentation. Instead of filing separate applications in each country where protection is required, an applicant will be able to file a single, standard format application with WIPO designating the jurisdictions where proceedings are to be initiated. A single application may include up to 100 different designs (if they all belong to the same class) and may designate any number of contracting countries or international organizations, such as the European Union.

In addition, the Hague Agreement and its implementing legislation, the Patent Law Treaties Implementation Act of 2012, make several important substantive changes to U.S. law and procedures affecting design patents. These changes include: extending the design patent term to 15 years, publishing international design applications, and creating provisional rights based on published applications. 

To see the complete article, please read on here

Posted by Elizabeth Curtin on

 Good afternoon. Here are the latest headlines in foreign patent filing news for the week of February 23rd:

  • According to the European Patent Office medical technology topped the list of technical fields with the highest volume of patent applications filed.
  • The EPO also released their completed 2014 Annual Report. A record number of total filings was reported (274,174), an overall increase of 3.1%. Read the entire report here
  • In case you missed it: Read about the latest updates regarding the America Invents Act and learn how to plan for the large volume of filings expected to hit in September and October.
  • From the USPTO: CFO Tony Scardino recently published their fiscal year 2016 Congressional Budget Justification. Read more here. 

Follow us on Twitter @inoviaIP for more patent updates and check back next week for more updates.

Posted by Elizabeth Curtin on

Good afternoon! We are attending numerous events from Stockholm to San Diego throughout the upcoming months. There's a good chance we might be in your area. So read on and get in touch with an inovia office near you to schedule a meeting:

International Women's Leadership - February 24th - London, United Kingdom

This forum will discuss Intellectual Property developments in Europe and provide an opportunity to listen and mingle with thought leaders in the IP field. Topics range from litigation and patent prosecution to copyright and trademark protection.

Nordic IPR - March 24-26 - Stockholm, Sweden

This is the longest running IPR forum in the Nordic region. Discussion formats, roundtables, panel debates and networking opportunities ensure that this is not one to miss!

Intellectual Property SpringPosium 2015 - April 10-11 - Adairsville, GA

Once again we will be sponsoring at the IP SpringPosium in Georgia. Here, you'll be able to earn CLE credit, network and relax in a beautiful resort in the mountains of Adairsville. 

INTA Annual Meeting 2015 - May 2-6 - San Diego, California

Probably the biggest IP event in the world, INTA is returning to the United States this year. We will be sending five team members to San Diego to attend educational sessions, meet with clients and prepare for another great year in Intellectual Property.

IPBC Global 2015 - June 14-16 - San Francisco, California

The IP Business Congress Global returns to the Bay Area after four years. The unitary patent system and heightened regulatory scrutiny throughout IP will be two major points of discussion at this years conference.

For links to register, please visit our events page and follow us on Twitter @inoviaIP for continuous updates!

Posted by Elizabeth Curtin on

For complete coverage of this topic, download inovia's comprehensive guide, "The Post AIA Foreign Filing Flood: How to Prepare"

Although the America Invents Act (AIA) involves US laws, the ramifications have been relevant to applicants all over the world for nearly two years. When the final changes of the AIA came into effect on March 16, 2013, applicants scrambled to file in large numbers as the Act included a number of provisions that would make it more difficult to obtain patent protection in the United States.

Read on to see how the uptick in filing numbers prior to March 16, 2013 is now contributing to a higher-volume filing period in September and October of 2015.

First, a bit of background on the America Invents Act 

Before we discuss an increase in filing numbers this fall, here is a bit of background on the America Invents Act. One of the most significant changes that occurred in implementing this new law was that the US lost its unique status as a first-to-invent jurisdiction. Previously, patent rights were granted to the first inventor who conceived of the invention and reduced it to practice (or diligently worked towards reducing it to practice). Starting on March 16, 2013, the first inventor to file got the patent rights. Now, the date of invention is irrelevant.

This change was monumental for the United States, as it aligned the US with almost every other country in the world. The next change that occurred on March 16, 2013 (hard to believe almost 2 years ago!), was the definition of prior art for assessing patentability. Previously, prior art included various uses (including sale) in the US, or written disclosures anywhere in the world. The AIA changed this so that any form of disclosure anywhere in the world forms part of the prior art.

Lastly, the change to first-inventor-to file meant that interference proceedings were no longer required. Instead, a derivations proceeding was available. This enabled inventors to challenge the owner of a patent with an earlier filing date, where the challenging inventor believed the earlier filer derived the invention from the challenging inventor.

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